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Top Ten States by Bar Fees                                  (Click to enlarge)

Not satisfied with already being near the top among highest U.S. cost-to-practice1 mandatory bar associations, on February 27, 2014 the Arizona Bar’s Board of Governors (BOG) voted 12-11 to hike annual member dues by 13% to $520 by 2019.

If at first you don’t succeed . . . .

Politicians 19The BOG first tried raising dues in December by 22%. But it was stymied when word got out about the stealth vote 12 days before Christmas. On being outed, the BOG regrouped and moved to postpone the vote till February. It then spun the delay as a self-congratulatory bid at notice, transparency and due process.

Unfortunately with more time to deliberate, the BOG also came up with a gambit. It dropped its initial $100 increase motion in favor of one that raised dues by ‘only’ $60. But there was a ‘catch.’ The lower increase was tied to an automatic escalator based on the consumer price index — as though what a state bar does has anything to do with the nation’s basket of consumer goods and services.

man face 6But fortunately, brakes were applied to the escalator. But as for the rest, “Il dado è tratto” as they still say in Italy long after Julius Caesar uttered Alea iacta est.In other words, “The die was cast.” When you’re talking fees, state bars always think it’s time to render to Caesar.

The rationale.

So given the Bar’s two-nostrils worth of rationale, it was never a question of “if” – but of “when” and by “how much.”

Wildlife & Animals 2247First, they’d argued the last dues increase was in 2005 as though there’s a gestation period for raising fees. And second, like that proverbial bushy-tailed chicken-counter in the hen-house, an increase was necessary. Or so said a supposed cost-analyzing “Program Review Committee” made up mostly of Bar staff and management. The committee took all of 9 hours over 3 months to do its multi-million dollar operational number-crunching and qualitative analysis.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1f/Langtry_cartoon.png/161px-Langtry_cartoon.pngSo to the surprise of no one, the committee pronounced there wasn’t much to cut from a bloated $14.6 million budget — not if bureaucratic stakeholders wanted to keep gilding the Bar’s ‘full-service’ lily. And as usual, the largely complaisant BOG went along.

Muddled confusion.

One thing the Bar’s spinmeisters also proclaimed was that Arizona’s fees are only tied for tenth highest among bar associations. But try running that declaration to ground.

When it comes to decoding what and how much lawyers pay to practice in a given jurisdiction, it’s frankly difficult. To start, you need something better than a secret decoder ring from a cereal box.

It’s a muddle. You have to parse, poke and ponder2 through data most of which is hidden behind expedient pay-walls. Or else you glean what you can from the Web whether the ABA or a state bar group.

Cartoon Characters 57Adding to the confusion, surveys lump mandatory bars (where you have to pay-to-play) together with voluntary jurisdictions.

Of course by mixing the apples with the oranges, it conveniently distorts the cost comparisons. And as long as we’re talking produce — it also helps keep the mushrooms fed and in the dark.

Don’t ask why voluntary bars are bunched in with the mandatory associations. It’s one thing to discretionarily and voluntarily pay high fees and quite another to be compelled if you want to keep more than snausages on the lawyer table.

Cost to Practice Rankings.

People 7054Ranking comparisons are as clear as mud. The last time I looked, the prior rankings were based on 2010 ABA surveys and the had Connecticut and Tennessee at No. 1 and No. 2, respectively. Both are voluntary bar associations. Both have non-bar-related fees that hurt.

But how was Georgia in third place at $536 when according to newer data compiled in 2013 by New Jersey’s Office of Attorney Ethics, Georgia’s “Maximum Mandatory Annual Fee” is $242?

International Survey of Attorney Licensing Fees

And take Connecticut where voluntary annual membership in the bar association costs $280. Although you’re not required to join to practice, Connecticut’s Department of Revenue Services still collects an annual attorney occupational tax of $565, which goes to the state general fund not for lawyer regulation. The state’s high court then tacks on a yearly $110 payment to the Client Security Fund.

Work World 14In Tennessee, also a non-mandatory bar state, $400 of the $570 fee lawyers pay is a “Professional Privilege Tax.” And like Connecticut, that money goes to state general revenue, not specifically to any bar-related function or to the Court.

And in Texas where membership is mandatory to practice, there’s a similar occupational tax that skews the cost-to-practice fees number higher. In the Lone Star State, $200 out of the $510 Texas lawyers pay to practice goes to state revenues not to fund the legal establishment.

International Survey of Attorney Licensing Fees - Chart 2

Distinctions without a difference? Who cares if Caesar is the state, the court, or the bar association? It’s all money flowing out of lawyer pockets. But it matters when mandatory bars conveniently use non-decoded figures as convenient pretexts to justify high mandatory licensing fees.

Children 1099So to make some semblance of the mud in the muddle, on a like-for-like dues comparison basis, Arizona is currently among the top three of the country’s 33 mandatory bars behind Alaska’s $660 and Hawaii’s $522. And going inactive in Arizona hardly saves you, either. Inactive Arizona Bar members pay $265 annually, highest among all jurisdictions and equal to or higher than what 20 other jurisdictions charge active bar members.3

Animals 2035And according to the most recent ABA Survey, among mandatory bars with more than 20,000 members, Arizona’s budget is 125 percent higher than the $11,720,787 average for comparably sized bars.

And high budgets notwithstanding, by the time the latest dues increase fully implements in 2019, the Bar itself projects about a $4M surplus. An almost $15 million budget, after all, wasn’t nearly enough money.

What’s more by separate motion, the BOG also got approval to impose higher fees for in-house counsel; admissions on motion; pro hac vice; and late fees for mandatory annual filings like continuing legal education.

Animals 702But at least there’s potential good news for Arizona lawyers. The Bar holds elections to its board of governors in May.

So when they get their online ballots and remember the incumbents who voted for even higher costs to practice, maybe members will also recall the moral in Aesop’s Fox and Stork fable.  As the stork told the fox, “One bad turn deserves another.”

 

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[1] See International Survey of Attorney Licensing Fees data compiled July 1, 2013 by Office of Attorney Ethics of New Jersey.

[2] Oregon fees include a $30 “diversity and inclusion assessment” and $45 for the client security fund (CSF), leaving a balance of $447. Comparable cost is actually less but close to Arizona’s $460 fee, $10 of which is for the client protection fund (CPF)). But Oregon also requires members to buy high-priced co-op professional liability insurance, which runs $3,200 per year even with modest coverage limits. There’s no deductible or penalty premium for purportedly high risk practice areas. In Hawaii, $34 is allocated to the Attorney Assistance Program and $30 to CSF. The remaining $440 is actually less than but very close to Arizona’s current fee of$460. Minus $65 for Legal Aid, the comparable cost in Texas is actually $235, considerably less than Arizona’s fees. Fees in Wisconsin include $50 for Legal Aid; $11 for a Mandatory CLE Fee; and $20 for CSF. That leaves $379, a comparable cost also less than Arizona’s fees. Based on all this, Arizona is actually ranked third in cost to practice. And while Alaska is Number One, it only requires 3 hours of CLE compared to Arizona’s 15. “Active Bar members are required to earn 3 ethics credits, encouraged to earn 9 additional credits, and required to file an MCLE Report each year.” See Alaska Bar Association MCLE at https://www.alaskabar.org/servlet/content/mcle.html. This effectively makes the cost lower to practice in Alaska than in Arizona. But then I’m adding bananas here to the apples and oranges. (Hat tip to D. M. Quinterri, Esq. for her additional data research!)

[3] “International Survey of Attorney Licensing Fees” data further notes Arizona has the highest fee for inactive attorneys. Op. cit.

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Photo Credits: Caricature from Punch magazine of Lily Langtry. From the Punch Christmas Issue, December 1890, “Punch Among the Planets” at Wikipedia Commons, Public Domain, available from Project Gutenberghttp://www.gutenberg.org/etext/13244

lipstick pigProbably thinking I needed it, someone recommended a book with pithy business and life advice. When I looked it up, I discovered it was larded with the kind of time-worn advice that if you live long enough, you’ll see over and over again. Only the color of the lipstick changes, but it’s still the same pig.

Besides, how many times can you write about building a better mousetrap? It would appear, interminably. Cicero had his moral lessons and Marcus Aurelius his meditations on life and Ben Franklin his “Poor Richard’s Almanack.” And almost 30 years ago, Robert Fulghum had “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten” with his version of epigrammatic life lessons, including for example,

“1. Share everything.
2. Play fair.
3. Don’t hit people.
4. Put things back where you found them.
5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.
6. Don’t take things that aren’t yours.
7. Say you’re SORRY when you HURT somebody.
8. Wash your hands before you eat.
9. Flush.
10. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
11. Live a balanced life – learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work everyday some.
12. Take a nap every afternoon.
13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
14. Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Styrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.
15. Goldfish and hamster and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup – they all die. So do we.
16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first words you learned – the biggest word of all – LOOK.”

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/Pannage_in_the_New_Forest.JPG/320px-Pannage_in_the_New_Forest.JPGObviously, there’s a lot of wisdom in such writings. So there’s a reason the old chestnuts are repeatedly repackaged for consumption for each generation.

Over time a few of the aphorisms and “lessons” have even made their way here.

So a few days ago, courtesy of Dumb Little Man – Tips for Life, I came across Dan Bacon’s “10 Ways to Be a Better Man (No you aren’t already doing them all.”

Which of course made me immediately think of a favorite romantic comedy, “As Good as It Gets and what Melvin Udall (Jack Nicholson) memorably told Carol Connelly (Helen Hunt) on their dinner date — “You Make Me Want to Be a Better Man.”

And has it really been 17 years since that movie came out and she called it “the best compliment of my life”?

But no matter. Time to take stock of Bacon’s iteration and of course, to challenge his gender conceit of a “better man.” Clearly, the 10 ways can also apply to women. Consider it was feminist Gloria Steinem who said, “Far too many people are looking for the right person, instead of trying to be the right person.”

“1. Don’t Crumble Under Pressure.

2. Give, But Also Expect Respect in Return.

3. Love Others Without Judgement.

4. Have Life Purpose and Follow Through On It.

5. Be a Man of Your Word.

6. Always be Yourself.

7. Maintain Control of Your Emotions.

8. Be Someone That People Look Up To.

9. Take the Lead in Situations.

10. Take Full Responsibility For Your Own Success or Failure.”

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Photo Credits: “Pig and piglets in woodland alongside Ober Water, New Forest” by Jim Champion at Wikipedia Commons, the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

 

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/96/Golf_ball_5.jpg/320px-Golf_ball_5.jpgA couple of Saturdays ago, we were paired up on the golf course with a happy wise-cracking guy who turned out to be a presiding judge in another jurisdiction. I won’t mention where he was from but let’s just say, he was one happy hombre hitting white dimpled balls in the sunshine while his cold snap compadres back home were freezing theirs.

He was also a much better duffer than me which, of course is no big deal since I set the bar pretty low on the golf course. But I especially liked his bracing candor and absence of pomposity particularly when referring to his day job. His ‘hail fellow well met’ attitude was refreshing. Ah, but then again, we were basking on a sunny Arizona golf course. Who knows what he’s like back home? But at least he wasn’t like Judge Spaulding Smails!

Nonetheless giving him the benefit of the doubt, mid-round I commended the long-time jurist for having successfully inoculated himself from black robe disease — and for not asking me to kiss his ring. Hearing my good-natured razzing, he laughed and smote his Pro-V-1 down the middle of the fairway.

And with that I segue to less berobbed congeniality in the following updates:

From the slapping the spanker file.

Remember Texas Judge William Adams who lost it in more ways than one? For those who forgot, he was the jurist suspended for a year after his daughter, Hillary, posted an embarrassing angry belt-whipping video online. Judge Adams was the belter and Hillary was the beltee. Well, add one more loss for the now ex-jurist. Following enough mea culpas, Judge Adams had been reinstated by the Texas Supremes in November 2012. But thing was, that video followed him around like the proverbial tin can tied to a cat’s tail. So thanks to getting caught beating his daughter on the video, he lost re-election last month. Chalk one up for prudent voters slapping down an ill-advised reelection bid. And give credit to much-maligned judicial elections, which now and then do somehow manage to impose some semblance of accountability courtesy of the voters.
Meanwhile back in Texas, remember Judge William Adams who lost it in more ways than one? For those who forgot, he was the jurist suspended for a year after his daughter, Hillary, posted a video online of the belt-whipping he administered. Well, add one more loss for the ex-jurist. The judge who was reinstated by the Texas Supremes in November 2012 after he was caught beating his daughter on video lost re-election in March. Chalk one up for voters slapping down an ill-advised reelection bid. And chalk up one for much-maligned judicial election voter accountability.
body parts,Buddhism,feet,footprints,religion,religious symbols,toes,visitations

From the foot massages no more file.

Sadly at only age 56, former Clark County, Nevada District Court Judge Elizabeth Halverson passed away March 1, 2014. She’ll be remembered for a lot of things, including the stuff that led to the imposition of judicial discipline. In particular, I’ll recall her former bailiff Johnnie Jordan’s affidavit where he said the judge had ordered him “to massage her feet, neck and shoulders, or some combination of those body parts.”  Also see “Foot massages no more. Nevada Supreme Court reaffirms district court judge’s permanent removal.”

From the shame in his game file.

photoAnd finally it turns out there was more than a little shame in the game of Wayne County, Michigan Circuit Judge Wade H. McCree Jr.

At least more than enough to convince the Michigan Supreme Court to hand down an order dated March 26, 2014 to remove from the bench the self-professed “No shame in my game” judge with a hankering for old-school R & B; inappropriate liaisons in chambers; and bare-chested texts.

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From the more FREE CLE file.

With the usual disclaimers about content, continued availability and jurisdictional approval find the following:

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National Institute for Trial Advocacy (NITA)

Studio71 Webcasts - NITA – National Institute for Trial Advocacy

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Miscellaneous Topics – Free & Online

For example,

  • Effective Handling & Use of Exhibits at Trial: How to Look Cool & Be Persuasive Using Stuff at Trial

May 20, 2014

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Length: 95 Minutes

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US Legal Journal

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FREE MCLE COURSE | US Legal Journal

Navigating the Ethical Minefield of Social Media for California Attorneys

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From the knickers in a bunch file.

Last week, the local paper’s editorial board was in high dudgeon grabbing all four cheeks over the wrist-slap inflicted on Fast, Furious and famous former U.S. Attorney for Arizona Dennis K. Burke.

The feather-duster on the wrist that upset the Arizona Republic’s editorial board came courtesy of the public reprimand administered to Burke by Arizona’s lords of lawyer discipline.

But who’s Dennis Burke? What’s Fast and Furious? For those not paying attention or thinking popcorn and high-grossing street racing films with Vin Diesel and the late Paul Walker, the LA Times at “ATF guns sting: Fast and Furious operation” has one of the better, more succinct explanations of what’s what. “A federal operation dubbed Fast and Furious allowed weapons from the U.S. to pass into the hands of suspected gun smugglers so the arms could be traced to the higher echelons of Mexican drug cartels. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which ran the operation, has lost track of hundreds of firearms, many of which have been linked to crimes, including the fatal shooting of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in December 2010.”

Dennis Burke US Attorney.jpgSince Operation Fast and Furious took place on Burke’s watch, the furor, the scandal, and the partisan political witch-hunting that erupted following Brian Terry’s death quickly engulfed Burke, the most senior of the DOJ officials implicated.

According to a New York Times story, shortly before he resigned as U.S. Attorney, Burke admitted “he had been the source for a document obtained by Fox News about the A.T.F. agent, John Dodson, who helped disclose risky tactics used in the case.” 

Lawyer discipline notwithstanding, I’m not sure why the Arizona Republic was so upset over what was one of the gentlest, almost apologetic censures I’ve ever read. And besides, Burke self-reported, too.

Most likely, Burke’s got BFFs at the paper. And so the editorialists were displeased. “What Burke did wasn’t something to be sanctioned,” they sniffed. “It was something to be celebrated.” See the March 27 disciplinary agreement here. Also see DOJ Sought Scapegoat for Fast and Furious, Former Arizona U.S. Attorney Says.”

File:Elephant Walking animated.gifBut Burke’s case aside, the elephant in the room.1 is really that hundreds of Department of Justice (DOJ) Attorneys have violated professional rules, laws or ethical standards — and that the public hasn’t a clue who they are. That’s because of DOJ’s longstanding practice of not disclosing the lawyers identified by its own Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR). We’re talking federal lawyers who’ve committed infractions ranging from the sloppily inadvertent to the downright egregious.

According to the Project on Government Oversight (POGO), “The result: the Department, its lawyers, and the internal watchdog office itself are insulated from meaningful public scrutiny and accountability.” Per its website, POGO “is a nonpartisan independent watchdog that champions good government reforms. POGO’s investigations into corruption, misconduct, and conflicts of interest achieve a more effective, accountable, open, and ethical federal government.”

File:Hiding.1.jpgThrough the Freedom of Information Act, POGO was able to obtain OPR data for a 12-year period from 2002 to 2013. Approximately 2,100 allegations of misconduct were unearthed ranging from intentional violations to mistakes and poor judgment involving federal attorneys. 650 instances were substantiated. Of these, more than 400 cases involved recklessness or intentional misconduct.

Meantime, the DOJ refuses to disclose the names of the lawyers OPR identified as having committed the offenses. In their number are federal attorneys who as OPR’s data reveals, misled courts at least 48 times, including 20 intentional violations; breached constitutional or civil rights 13 times; and did not provide exculpatory information to defendants 29 times. Read the POGO report here.

For the time being, wrist-slaps or not — they’re the Untouchables” so don’t be looking for bar discipline either.

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1Hat tip to Mark Brennan for sending me the link to POGO’s report concerning the U.S. DOJ refusal to disclose its attorney violators, including more than 400 categorized by its own internal investigatory agency as the more severe on its scale.

Photo Credits: “Dork,” by Dan4th Nicholas at Flickr via Creative Commons-licensing requiring attribution; “Dennis K. Burke,” Dennis_Burke_US_Attorney.jpg at Wikipedia Commons, work of U.S. Government, public domain; Animated version of File:Elephant walking.jpg, by Eadweard Muybridge at Wikipedia Commons, public domain; Hiding.1.jpg by Loveteamin at Wikimedia Commons under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Even in Maricopa County, Arizona where most everyone has transplanted from someplace else, no one likes hearing about how things were done elsewhere. It’s as welcome as grey-whiskered prattle about “how things were when I was a kid.” Put a sock in it.

All the same, ignore the sock hanging out my mouth while I favorably compare what my former home state of Nevada just did concerning the unauthorized practice of law (UPL).

UPL as most of you know is a tiresome pet peeve of mine. But for all my frustration, as far as Arizona’s concerned when it comes to dealing seriously with UPL, it’s rubbing fingers and playing the world’s tiniest violin.

But back in the Silver State there’s AB74, a new Nevada law effective March 1, 2014 that imposes new controls on legal document preparation services — or what lawyers think of as the unauthorized practice of law. Fortunately, instead of creating another self-perpetuating legal establishment bureaucracy like in Arizona, AB74 requires document preparation services to register with the Secretary of State; establishes qualifications for registration; requires the filing of a bond; regulates the business practices of document preparation services; authorizes disciplinary action and other remedies in specified circumstances; and provides civil and (unlike Arizona) criminal penalties.

File:Otis fence.jpgNevada’s approach is admirably distinguishable from what the ‘self-enlightened’ legal elites did in Arizona. Here the legal eagles didn’t soar to curtail the unauthorized practice of law. Instead the privileged classes ‘fixed’ it by saying it wasn’t UPL. Arizona exempted out a slew of non-lawyers from UPL by judicial fiat.

As a consequence, Also see “Immcrimination: Document preparation in Arizona in the wake of USA v. Arizona.”

No “conscious uncoupling” from the mandatory bar.

Which gets me to say something nice for a change about a state bar president, Nevada’s Alan J. Lefebvre. He’s finishing out his term and in his last several presidential epistles in the bar’s mouthpiece magazine, Nevada Lawyer, Lefebvre’s demonstrated refreshing candor — at least by complaisant state bar standards. He’s decried the current state of the legal profession, which has “done nothing to protect and rescue” newly graduated debt-indentured lawyer graduates. See “President’s Message: “Maybe Reparations are Owed?”

photoAnd unlike the self-congratulatory B.S. typically spewed by bar management milquetoast sock puppets, Lefebvre has also inveighed against the bureaucratic status quo.

Otherwise, as mandatory bar presidents go, the ones with any real cojones have been those never-say-quit anti-mandatory bar presidents in Wisconsin — three of the last four elected. Despite long odds, they’ve been fighting for a voluntary bar for many years. And trying to divorce themselves from compulsory bar membership, they’ve waged their own version of “conscious uncoupling” well before Gwyneth Paltrow was therapeutically psycho-babbling about it.

Sometime ago, one former Wisconsin bar president who’s advocated for a voluntary bar for decades even made headway based on compelled Free Speech grounds. But it was short-lived. His victory was reversed on appeal by the 7th Circuit.

To be clear, however, that guy in Nevada ain’t advocating removal of the mandatory bar yoke — that’s a furrow too far for most bar insiders. But at least he’s shooting straight on UPL and about what Nevada’s new legislation means. In his latest “Message from the President,” Lefebvre rails against “the commoditization of the practice” and how “the unchecked growth of the Unauthorized Practice of Law (UPL) has been eating away at the financial resiliency of the legal profession for years and years, as we attorneys rub our palms together anxiously, doing nothing.” See “President’s Message: Unauthorized Practice of Law: Redux …

Lefebvre’s so effusive he even signals out Lucy Flores, the bill’s author who he says, “should get a ‘lawyer of the year’ award for her foresight.”

Foresight — what a concept. But so’s candor and especially, courage.

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Photo Credits: “Whitby Sock One,” by LollyKnit at Flickr via Creative Commons-requiring attribution; 200px-Blnguyen_violin.jpg at Wikimedia Commons; Otis_fence.jpg at Wikimedia Commons under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license;”in other words, you have a big mouth,” by Vera at Flickr via Creative Commons-requiring attribution;”Nadya with sock puppet and fish, 2007″ by Nadya Peek at Flickr via Creative Commons-license requiring attribution.

Ah mentorship — the latest state bar flavor of the month. Seems all the bars are doing it in various forms. But mandatory bars empowered as they are as a condition of licensure to compel lawyers to join and to pay dues to practice law are especially the self-anointed flavorists. And no longer satisfied with burdening new lawyers with required courses in “professionalism,” they’re moving to force the newly-admitted whether they like the taste or not to get their palates around year-long mandatory mentorship programs. So much for six-figure ‘practice-ready’ law school training.

Hardly a surprise. When they’re not cooking up solutions to nonexistent problems, state bars like to look like they’re helping — even when they’re not. It’s their version of George Costanza’s how to look like you’re busy when you’re really not.

Forced mentorship.

Mentorship used to mean a trusting, voluntary relationship between an experienced senior guide and a willing, inexperienced junior colleague wanting personal and professional growth. In self-determined mentoring, the mentor voluntarily agreed to coach and to advise and the mentee voluntarily accepted the mentor’s tutelage.

Given what mentorship used to mean, “forced mentorship” turns the concept on its oxymoronic head even though it’s not quite the obvious incongruity as the compelled compassion of mandatory pro bono inflicted on New York’s wanna-be bar candidates. Professor Paul Campos called that one “utterly wrongheaded.” But it’s close.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You’re on your own, and you know what you know. And you are the guy who’ll decide where to go.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/d/drseuss414097.html#wT3sRZa1ZVJ0F7WP.99
You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You’re on your own, and you know what you know. And you are the guy who’ll decide where to go.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/d/drseuss414097.html#wT3sRZa1ZVJ0F7WP.99 They’ve also produced a historic glut of new graduates resulting in an oversupply of new lawyers unable to find full-time, long-term employment as lawyers. And thanks to unconscionably high tuition, their graduates have been saddled with unprecedented loan debts. the consumer-protective more and more of them are opting to go solo. professional relationship in which an experienced person

Paraphrasing Ronald Reagan, “The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, ‘I’m from the bar and I’m here to help.’”

No easy task.

Mentoring doesn’t come easy, especially for lawyers who some argue “have never been big fans of people skills.” For one, lawyer-psychologist maintains “Culturally, the legal profession has historically relegated people skills to an unwelcome corner of the room. Even today, many lawyers belittle, dismiss, devalue and mock any mention of such skills.”

Moreover, who has the time? And second, trust and rapport don’t just happen. And then there’s what one publication referred to as “The Misery of Mentoring Millennials.” Research is finding the old “hard-core pursuit of guidance” mentorship models don’t work so well with the “bold and hungry” Generation Z more accustomed to Twitter-length conversations than long-term communications with their seniors.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e8/Clockmakers_black_forest.jpg/320px-Clockmakers_black_forest.jpg

And speaking of long-term conversations, there’s that other obvious challenge. Ask some lawyers what time it is and they build you a watch.

File:Blah blah.gifI asked one lawyer on a real estate matter how deep the well was on the rural property and never got an answer. Instead I heard an eye-glazing discourse on water tables, aquifers, bore holes and drilling machines.

Another lawyer gave me a rambling treatise on civil procedure in response to a query on the finer points of pleading sufficiency under Rule 12(b) (6). Don’t worry. I won’t bore you with pleading standards.

These are considerations to think about now that mandatory associations have delved into what they think is the next big thing. Not that they’ll pay attention. Group-think is tasty fodder for herd-following bar bureaucrats.

Six jurisdictions have already started mentoring programs requiring new law school grads to sign up and seasoned lawyers to volunteer. Of course they’re not free. New Mexico, for example, requires new lawyers to pay $300 for a “Bridge The Gap” program but at least that covers a year’s worth of continuing legal education. Utah’s program is similar with mentees earning 12 continuing legal education credits for their $300 required participation fee.

Under Oregon’s compulsory mentoring program, new lawyers pay $100 and get 6 continuing legal education credit hours toward the 45 hours of approved continuing legal education mandated in a 3 year reporting period.

 

Oregon’s program appears the one the bean-counters at the Arizona bar are hot and bothered over. But since Arizona’s bar leaders have yet to meet a fee they didn’t want to raise, don’t be surprised if mandatory mentorship doesn’t cost more here than in Oregon.

So while Millenial lawyers may get annoyed over one more hurdle to practice, it’s all good for the mandatory bars. After all, even if these programs are more facade than fix, the bars’ feel-good watch-me-do-something initiatives will not only look good but will create one more income stream.

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Photo Credits: “oh.my.goshk,” by Abulic Monkey at Flickr via Creative Commons-license requiring attribution; Blah_blah.gif at Wikimedia Commons, by Obsidian Soul via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license; Benjamin Franklin shown here on a U.S. $100 bill, Wikimedia Commons, public domain.

Lawyers in Colorado are smart to be circumspect about what their attorney lords of discipline might do to them if they start counseling marijuana-related businesses or partaking a bit of the herb for themselves. Notwithstanding that January 1, 2014 it became legal for Colorado residents 21-years of age and older to legally buy up to an ounce of recreational marijuana, the state’s lawyers aren’t so sure how that applies to them.

Consider that some jurisdictions impose disciplinary sanctions on lawyers for illegal drug use, which can range from reprimands to suspensions to disbarment.

File:Image The Devil s Weed.jpgAlready risk-adverse by dint of occupation, Colorado’s lawyers are afraid to tread where only tokers rush in. They have a lot to lose: their bar licenses and their monopolistic meal-tickets.

So they want assurances first. Indeed, according to a report from Time, “a stream of lawyers and judges appeared at the Colorado Supreme Court on Thursday to argue for rule changes that would explicitly allow lawyers to give advice related to marijuana without fearing disciplinary action — as well as use marijuana themselves.” See “Colorado Lawyers Want to Get High Like Everybody Else.” Also see “Ethics Panel Asks Colorado Supreme Court To Amend Rules, Authorize Marijuana Advice.”

The problem arises because while recreational marijuana use in Colorado is legal — not so with the feds. More specifically, what’s worrying Colorado’s lawyers is Ethics Rule 8.4 Misconduct, which says “It is professional misconduct for a lawyer to (b) commit a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness or fitness as a lawyer in other respects.”

320px-Irene_Ryan_1968Understandably, Rocky Mountain High lawyers want to first make sure they’ll be protected from discipline under that rule before they indulge in personal use or “strictly for medicinal purposes” as Granny used to say about her ‘roomatiz medicine,’ 

File:Drug bottle containing cannabis.jpgWhat’s more, at least for now the Standing Committee studying the matter has already nixed recommending protections to enterprising Colorado lawyers who might’ve entertained broadening their legal practices to include operating marijuana-related commercial businesses.

Unlike those coffee-cum-counseling legal services operations in California, there won’t be any cannabis-cum-counseling legal services providers in Colorado. What a concept that would’ve been — clients eager to visit their lawyers.

Still, the whole thing is taking a long time. Colorado’s legal establishment has been wrestling over it for over a year. But at long last, a final decision is imminent. And probably not soon enough for lawyers craving a bit of ganja with their Marley.

Meanwhile here in Arizona, pot use is limited to prescribed medical purposes. Consequently, what confronted the local lawyer ethics police was different from what faces Colorado’s lawyer disciplinary gurus.

Just before the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act took effect on April 14, 2011, which legalized medical marijuana for use by people with certain “chronic or debilitating” diseases, the Arizona Bar formed their own task force to study the Act’s implications. The result was a carefully delineated, narrowly tailored ethics opinion. But like all such opinions, prudent lawyers know it’s always caveat emptor or in this case, ‘cannabis consuasor emptor’ when relying on a state bar’s disclaimer-laden ethics opinions.

So regardless of outcome, Colorado lawyers wanting to toke up will be well advised to follow not just the bar’s counsel but the Bard’s, “Discretion is the better part of valor.”

Experienced lawyers already know. If you call ethics counsel for precise, distinct ethics advice, chances are their counsel will be magically worthy of J.R.R. Tolkien’s admonition about elves, Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes.”

In Arizona, for example, the “formal opinions of the Committee on the Rules of Professional Conduct are advisory in nature only and are not binding in any disciplinary or other legal proceedings.” [Emphasis added]

Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/Marijuana_and_pipe.jpg/320px-Marijuana_and_pipe.jpg

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Photo Credits: “She Shoulda Said No!” at Wikimedia Commons, public domain, Image_The_Devil_s_Weed.jpg;“marijuana joint,” by Torben Hansen at Flickr via Creative Commons-license requiring attribution; Irene Ryan as Granny Clampett, Beverly Hillbillies, at Wikimedia Commons, public domain;Drug_bottle_containing_cannabis.jpg ‎ at Wikimedia Commons, public domain.; “Marijuana and a pipe,” by Erik Fenderson, 2006-03-19, at Wikimedia Commons, public domain.

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