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AndrewThomas.jpgAs he said he’d do, disbarred former Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas is running for Governor of Arizona — along with the usual Arizona collection of migrant-demonizing far right extremists — each battling to outdo the other on talking tough about the border.

Nothing plays so well in Arizona than bashing ‘dem illegals’ and scaring seniors with tales about border-crossing brown-skinned border brothers.

But thanks to Arizona’s semi-closed primary system; customary low voter turnout and a reliably apathetic electorate unwilling to “DeKook the State Capitol,” it won’t matter who wins. One of the extremists will be elected and it’ll be more of the same for Arizona.

Payback.

‘Candy Andy,’ though, is back. Not that he really ever went away. In the words of the late not-so-great former Arizona Governor Evan Meacham, “I’ll tell you what, if a band of homosexuals and a few dissident Democrats can get me out of office, why heavens, the state deserves what else they can get.”  

And now that he wants to be governor, Thomas is probably hoping for the ‘Big Payback.’ Maybe he even thinks he’ll get the chance to pull a ‘California Governor Pete Wilson’ and give the State Bar of Arizona as much heartburn as Wilson gave the California Bar in 1997.

As for his chances — I wouldn’t rule him out. After all, this is a state with “asinus aspirations aplenty” and with an electorate that made Jan Brewer governor twice and Joe Arpaio Maricopa County Sheriff six times. So anything’s possible when you set the bar that low.

andrew-thomas-video-ad.jpgA week ago Tuesday, Thomas began running his first 30-second campaign ad. And he hit the controversy superfecta hammering on “illegal immigration;” condemning “liberal judges;” opposing “the gay lobby;” and aggravating trading-partner Mexico by crossing out the Mexican flag. Clearly he’s not lost his touch for serving red meat to his base or for making ‘amigos’ across the border.

Schadenfreude: Happiness at the Misfortune of Others.

 But speaking of dishes best served cold, I have little doubt Thomas was elated when in April of this year, news reports announced that his arch-nemesis, John Gleason, had been forced out of his job as the chief lord of prosecutorial discipline for the Oregon State Bar. After retiring from his post as head of Colorado’s Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel, Gleason had shown up in Oregon last March to take the job as Oregon State Bar disciplinary counsel and director of regulatory services. It didn’t turn out to be a long stint — only about a year. According to reports, it was “a short stormy run that antagonized lawyers around the state and divided the Oregon State Bar.”Besides asking for an ABA task force to come in to review Oregon’s disciplinary system, Gleason got some lawyers riled when he proposed some sweeping changes to the way lawyers are disciplined for ethical violations in Oregon. He proposed creating the office of Presiding Disciplinary Judge; a complete rewrite of the Bar’s Rules of Procedure; and a substantial reduction in the oversight and authority of the bar’s volunteer State Professional Responsibility Board in favor of more centralized authority with Gleason’s office of disciplinary counsel.

After his 2012 disbarment, Thomas told the press he’d been the victim of “a political witchhunt” for having “brought corruption cases in good faith involving powerful people, and the political and legal establishment blatantly covered up and retaliated by targeting my law license.” None of that got him anywhere with the judge but it might sell in Peoria — Arizona. For more background, see The ABA Journal’s “The Maricopa Courthouse War.”

But for all those who crowed Thomas’ comeuppance, the fact he’s running for governor has to grate — and with $754,000 in public financing funds, to boot.

And speaking of dishes best served cold, I have little doubt Thomas was elated when this past April, there occurred one more instance of schadenfreude cutting both ways. Or said more familiarly, another testament to ‘what goes around, comes around.’ John Gleason, the lead prosecutor, brought in at the behest of the Arizona bar and the state supreme court to bring Thomas to heel gave up his job in Oregon.

Gleason had been Colorado’s Attorney Regulation Honcho when he took the temporary gig in Arizona to prosecute Thomas for abusing his county attorney powers. In a 33-page complaint, Thomas and his cohorts were accused of misusing the office’s broad prosecutorial power to go after political enemies.

After wrapping up the Thomas et al. prosecution and then retiring from his post as head of Colorado’s Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel, Gleason turned up in Oregon in March 2013 to take the job as Oregon State Bar disciplinary counsel and director of regulatory services.

It didn’t turn out to be a long stint — only about a year. According to a news account, it was “a short stormy run that antagonized lawyers around the state and divided the Oregon State Bar.”

Besides asking for an ABA task force to review Oregon’s disciplinary system, Gleason had riled up lawyers by proposing sweeping changes to the way Oregon lawyers are disciplined for ethical violations. He proposed creating something he’s especially fond of, the office of Presiding Disciplinary Judge. He also recommended rewriting completely the Bar’s Rules of Procedure. Finally, he proposed reducing substantially the oversight and authority of the bar’s volunteer State Professional Responsibility Board in favor of centralized authority under his own office of disciplinary counsel.

Too bad he couldn’t leave well enough alone and just sit on his laurels for defrocking Thomas. For stories that lionize and crown him in those laurels see “All Kinds of Horrible Things Happened’: Investigating the Biggest Ethical Misconduct Case in the Nation” and “Prosecutor on Trial: Ex-Maricopa County Attorney.” With such plaudits and press clippings, he just couldn’t resist bringing his bumptious beneficent benefactions to the Beaver State.

For balance and other perspectives on Gleason, read “Scott McInnis plagiarism scandal no big deal to attorney discipline czar” and “Why Colorado Attorneys Dont Have Spines” and particularly, “A Travesty of Justice in Colorado: Lawyer Suspended for A Year and A Day for WINNING His Client’s Case.”

As for where Gleason turns up next, who knows? Consigned to Colorado, he may just stay retired and look for a regular golf partner. Although as far as wanna-be Governor Thomas’s concerned, at least he’s not back in Arizona. But if he does return to the desert kookracy, guess who’s hoping will have the last laugh?

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Photo Credits: Jan Brewer – the Guard, by DonkeyHotey at Flickr via Creative Commons-license requiring attribution;Mr Schadenfreude, by Duncan Hull at Flickr via Creative Commons-license requiring attribution.

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John Lennon was right. “Life is what happens when you’re busy making other plans.” Not long after I ate a couple of yellow nectarines yesterday afternoon, I got a robocall. It was from the big box store where I’d purchased the fruit. 

The automated voice told me to return the nectarines I’d just eaten. There was a voluntary recall over potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Regurgitation no longer an option, timing is everything. But what the . . . . ?

So knock on wood. And thankfully, no symptoms. Yet it’s come to this. Time to nix the nectarines and the burritos around here.

Happy news.

But forget the bad news for now. Let’s make happy talk instead. Out of New York City and London, I read about a new confidence builder. It’s the ‘shiney-hiney,’ also known as the “butt facial.” And according to the news report in The Week, it’s offered this summer by enterprising dermatologists in both cities.

The fanny facial is “a combination of exfoliating peels, lasers, and moisturizers to smooth the skin on the buttocks and minimize dark spots, zits, and cellulite.One client quoted for the news story said, “before I tried the booty facial, I wasn’t as confident as I am now.”

So no kidding, a confidence builder! Could it be the next self-assurance tool before heading to court? Also see “A new take on glowing ‘cheeks'”

Unhappily, I don’t know of any dermatologists offering keister cleansing spa treatments in Arizona’s nether regions. Then again, except for those supposed confidence-building properties, around here all 4 cheeks get plenty pink without dermatological exfoliation thanks to Arizona’s hot and sweaty six-month summer.

Confident construction.

Besides, who needs confidence building here? Not, for instance, ASU’s law school leadership. Why those folks are just dripping with confidence. Despite reports of “shrinking law schools facing financial devastation,” Monday’s Arizona Republic newspaper puff-pieced ‘happy news’ about the start of construction of ASU’s ballyhooed new $129 million downtown law school. The story read like an ASU press release.

Don’t blame the nectarines but after reading, I didn’t know whether to gag or spit. Despite continuing historic lows in the number of law school admissions test-takers “a record low going back to June 2000″ as reported this week by The Law School Tuition Bubble, “it’s damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead.” While other law schools are “paring back,”  ASU’s law school cognoscenti must be eating not reading their tea leaves. And the local paper appears to be riding shotgun in the same clown car with the law school’s dean. Good thing there’s plenty of room.

In a 2012 interview about the state of legal education, law school dean Doug Sylvester happy-talked, “I don’t think we’re in crisis.”  So why not keep betting on the come? See “Law schools imperiled but insiders keep ignoring the changing tide.Also see “Law school applications down 37 percent since 2010; first-year class could be smallest in 40 years.”

But it’s nice he’s putting the OPM — other people’s money — where his mouth is and blithely proceeding apace. Per the paper, “The law school’s dean, Douglas Sylvester, is so enthused, several times a day he pulls up a webcam on his computer that shows an aerial view of construction.”

Lawyer glut? Too much law school capacity? No worries. Sylvester thinks all that extra space at his expanded new digs — at least for now won’t mean adding more students onto a glutted legal marketplace. He’s keeping enrollments the same.

But it’ll be just dandy for adding two think-tanks; housing a law school sponsored law firm for otherwise out-of-work alumni; for offering more continuing legal education; and of course, for expanding “the degree referred to by critics as a “cash cow”, the LLM, the Master of Laws degree.

The LLM is the graduate degree popularly derided as “Lawyers Losing Money.” Writes Bryce Wilson Stucki at The American Prospect, “To critics, the degree is little more than a scam making extra cash from attorneys desperate to burnish their credentials in a brutal legal job market.” Also see “Inside the Law School Scam: LLM programsand for a much more acerbic take, see “LLM Programs are “Popular” Due to Desperation Among Recent Unemployed J.D.s”

Money in HandOf that Master of Laws Degree, George Leef at ForbesLaw Schools Peer Into The Abyss But The American Bar Association Blocks Serious Change,” also echoes the critics who think it’s the “Next scam: Law schools start “nonprofit” law firms that hire their own graduates, thus boosting their U.S. News rankings by ensuring their grads have jobs while letting their students get out from under debt in half the time. Plus, faculty can have high-paying side jobs managing things at the “nonprofit.””

So while another law school cuts faculty and staff jobs and halts first year classes to belatedly confront plunging law school enrollments, another expands and leverages its profit centers.

Growth for growth’s sake.

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File:Laughing Fool.jpgLike Cher, Article III federal judges answer only to themselves and to God — assuming, that is, they aren’t atheists — otherwise they’re not answering to the Almighty either.

Which leads me to question why given how untouchable they are, some folks, granted mostly lawyers are nonetheless so exercised over Federal Judge Richard Kopf having told the U.S. Supreme Court it should ‘STFU.” One nose-out-of-joint conservative law school professor was so peeved at Judge Kopf he even went for the cheap ad hominem and called him “dummKopf.” I hope Steve Bainbridge doesn’t really think he’s the clever first one to think up that pun when he ranted it was the judge who should STFU.

The 68-year old Judge Kopf is retired but on senior status since December 1, 2011. This means he’s working at-large as a judge but assigned to any inferior federal court while receiving his retirement salary.

Hercules and the umpire.

But besides working as a senior justice, he also has a personal blog called “Hercules and the umpire” where he waxes either eloquent or inappropriate depending on your sociopolitical point of view.

Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s latest controversial decision involving a closely-held corporation’s personhood and its attendant religious beliefs concerning Obamacare-mandated contraceptives in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., the very opinionated Judge Kopf invoked the acronym, STFU, to argue the nation’s high court is “causing more harm (division) to our democracy than good by deciding hot button cases that the Court has the power to avoid.” But it was that acronym that got people’s underwear in an uncomfortable bunch.

For the uninitiated, STFU is simply short-hand for shut the F-bomb up. Oh, my, that a judge would deign to use such language? At least it wasn’t in any judicial opinion.

Cebull didn’t blog.

http://lawmrh.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/judge-cebull.jpg?w=181&h=203Maybe if the now retired 70-year old Federal Judge Richard Cebull had blogged instead of emailing on his office computer, he might’ve kept his racist robes and his own senior status another day? Just kidding.

You’ll recall an investigation by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judicial Council revealed Judge Cebull had sent hundreds of “racist, sexist and politically inflammatory” e-mail messages over four years while serving as a federal judge in Montana. Parenthetically, Native American advocacy groups are still petitioning to see all the ex-judge’s racist emails but the 9th Circuit keeps saying ‘No.’ They’re supposedly confidential. Oh well, at least they’re just ‘secret’ and not ‘lost’ like Lois Lerner’s missing IRS emails.

“Dirty old man.”

http://static.someecards.com/someecards/usercards/MjAxMi01Y2Q5Y2I1MGRhMzg5M2Yw.pngIt’s not like Judge Kopf hasn’t been here before. A self-described “dirty old man ever since I was a very young man,” he got people worked up just a few months ago when he posted “On being a dirty old man and how young women lawyers dress.”

In that post, he wrote “I have three rules that young women lawyers should follow when considering how to dress for court: 1. You can’t win. Men are both pigs and prudes. Get over it. 2. It is not about you. That goes double when you are appearing in front of a jury. 3. Think about the female law clerks. If they are likely to label you, like Jane Curtin, an ignorant slut behind your back, tone it down.”

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a9/Hans_Conried_Uncle_Tonoose_Danny_Thomas_Show_1959.JPG/363px-Hans_Conried_Uncle_Tonoose_Danny_Thomas_Show_1959.JPGFilters? What filters?

Let me first inoculate myself against accusations of ageist stereotyping. I’m well past my middle-earlies. That said, perhaps age should at least, be discussed here.

Besides our own anecdotal evidence about crazy uncles ruining holidays “with outlandish behavior and boorish opinions,” studies support what some of us have long suspected, aging brains not only drive forgetfulness but blunt behavior.

In one study, “Aging, Executive Functioning, and Social Control,” researcher William von Hippel found that physiological changes such as aging-related atrophy of the brain’s frontal lobes, which he calls “the seat of executive functions” are associated with “age-related inhibitory losses.” This can lead to unvarnished prejudice, “off-target verbosity” and “socially inappropriate remarks.” For an unscholarly, inelegant take on the same topic, also see “Old People Saying Shit They Should Not.

Any wonder that 75-year old Federal Judge Richard Posner recommends judges after 70 be required to takea test of mental acuity every five years.”

Judge Robert Malcolm Kerr of whom it was said, “He administers a kind of rough and ready justice that irritates many and pleases few.”

But when it comes to the berobed, the combination of age-related inhibitory deficits with hubristic-minded ‘black robe disease’ also called “Judge-Itis” — why that’s downright pyrotechnic. In some quarters, judge-itis has morphed into Judge Judy-fication. For examples, remember King County, Washington’s real-life Judge Judy Eiler or the very recent Brevard County Florida Brawling Judge John Murphy. As historian Barbara Tuchman said, “A greater inducement to folly is an excess of power.”

So if media-celebrated ‘no nonsense’ ‘tough-talkers’ on the bench can gloss over Model Code of Judicial Conduct Canon 2’s sub paragraphs on courtroom decorum and demeanor, why can’t judges with personal blogs?

“Everyone was thinking it, I just said it.”

Not to say that 60-somethings and older have cornered inhibitory deficits. Take San Diego California’s Judge DeAnn Salcido, a member of Generation X who was reprimanded for using her courtroom to create audition tapes for a Judge Judy-style television show.

http://lawmrh.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/e15ef-filter.jpg?w=327&h=227Unabashed, she said, “I have a big mouth. I don’t know when to be quiet. I’m telling you everything I know. That’s just the way it’s going to be. I don’t know how to change that. It’s a defect in my personality.” Methinks she needs a blog, too.

And then over the weekend, I finally had enough. I’d been following an anonymous Millenial and once-upon-a-time wanna-be lawyer turned author/blogger. I once thought his blog was refreshingly funny even with all the profligate F-bombs. But then his profane posts kept crossing the line from witty real-world impertinence to nasty hyperbolic meanness. And after reading his last post describing what he’d be willing to do if someone paid off all his student debt, I finally said “No mas” and unfollowed.

No filters.

So when it comes to blurting out whatever pops in your head regardless of the consequences, I’m now inclined to think age is irrelevant. As a society, thanks to social media, online anonymity and no-longer-taught etiquette, we have no filters.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/72/The_Wounded_Angel_-_Hugo_Simberg.jpg/298px-The_Wounded_Angel_-_Hugo_Simberg.jpgWhich gets me back to Judge Kopf. In his latest post, “Please stop,” the blogging judge says he’s reconsidering his blog after all the fallout from his STFU post. In his post, he reprints a communication received from a Nebraska lawyer who he says has his “highest respect.” In his missive, the lawyer appeals idealistically to Judge Kopf’s ‘better angels of our nature’ and asks him to stop blogging — lest it bring discredit on the public’s understanding of the judicial system.

But from my quick unscientific review of the comments to this post, it seems most readers favor his continued blogging. So as Judge Kopf contemplates what he’s going to do, not to worry. It’s not like public confidence in the Supreme Court isn’t already at a historic low or that judicial irreverence means the public will think as Dickens’ Mr. Bumble did that “the law is an ass.” I think he should keep blogging.

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Photo Credits: Laughing Fool, source http://www.wellesley.edu/DavisMuseum/collections/provenance_research.htm at Wikipedia Commons, public domain;American magazine ad for the film Hercules (1959), HerculesMagazine.jpg, Wikimedia Commons, public domain;Hans Conried as Uncle Tonoose, Wikimedia Commons, public domain;Robert Malcolm Kerr, Vanity Fair, 1900-11-22m Wikimedia Commons,Public Domain; The Wounded Angel,Hugo Simberg, Wikimedia Commons, public domain.


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I love juxtapositions. It’s an odd personality trait. Or maybe, it’s the heat. Or it’s niggling sleep deprivation now that I’m up earlier than usual — before 4:30 AM to walk our dogs before the summer sun scorches paws and dehydrates lolling tongues. It clears 90°F before 8 AM.

Take, for instance, my frequent lumping together of ‘Old Skool’ rhythm and blues with otherwise unrelated substantive topics. Regular readers know, for example, I especially like Old Skool’ Riffing on Godfather of Soul James Brown.

So when news hit that Brevard County Florida Judge John C. Murphy was back but handling civil cases after less than 30 days of paid vacation leave for reportedly scuffling outside his courtroom with Assistant Public Defender Andrew Weinstock, you’ll understand why “Get Up Offa That Thing” started playing in my head. However, I’ll admit that this particular jurist doesn’t strike me as someone who’d channel Soul Brother No. 1‘s happy “I’m back! I’m back!” refrain.

Brawl in Brevard.

You remember the “Stop pissing me off . . . if you want to fight, let’s go out back”  ‘Brawl in Brevard.’ That’s when after ripping the public defender a new one in his court, Judge Murphy irascibly took matters out to the hallway for a more serious heart-to-heart with the surprisingly unintimidated Andrew Weinstock.

I prognosticated then, “I don’t expect much to happen to Judge Murphy.” So he’s back already. Also see “Judge who hit public defender returns to bench, less than a month later.”

People 7442Sure the Judicial Qualifications Commission reportedly opened an investigation. But seeing how the wagons have already circled around Judge Murphy, I still predict, if anything, the gentlest of admonitions. Besides, according to news reports, no criminal charges were filed in the incident.

 

Boy with his hands on his face uidOpen Letter Contrition — but not for all.

In an open letter released “To the Residents of Brevard County,” Judge Murphy has moved to put the embarrassing episode behind him. “I am happy and relieved to be back at work serving the people of Brevard County and I thank [Chief Justice] Judge Harris for his support and the confidence he has shown to me,” he wrote.

Not to worry, I guess, if the Judicial Qualifications Commission happens to make a probable cause determination and the whole thing’s sent for adjudication to supportive Chief Justice Harris and the Florida Supreme Court.

In his letter, Judge Murphy expressed “regret” for his actions. And he “committed to continuing personal improvement” and to “win back” public trust and confidence. He offered “my personal apology” to each of his 18th Judicial Circuit colleagues and to “judges everywhere.” Curiously, he made no mention of Weinstock, the object of his ire, nor did he apologize to him. But at least he left out the standard non-apology apology.

Yet as the New York Times reported a few days ago, voters can expect more judicial contrition in Florida. See “Here Comes the Judge, in Cuffs – In Broward County, Fla., Spate of Judges in D.U.I. Arrests.” Yeah, I know — let he who is without sin hide behind the nearest rock pile.

Dominick/Flickr

And to reassure the county electorate that he hopes will again reelect him, Judge Murphy also added, “I seek to ensure that this sort of unacceptable behavior will never happen again.” The words “seek to ensure” reminded me of that scene from “The Outlaw Josey Wales.” It was where Dan George as Lone Watie described his visit with the other Chiefs of the Five Civilized Tribes to the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary nonsensically tells them “Endeavor to persevere.” I imagine the judge will likewise “endeavor to persevere” not to spar, biff, or poke public defenders on premises.

1158073_paper_emotions_-_hateNot the last angry man.

To assist those aspirations, while on his taxpayer-paid leave, Judge Murphy took part in a favorite bureaucratic fix — anger management. The courts may not have them but I have my doubts about anger management programs and whether they even work.

Of anger management classes, the Health Journal at the Wall Street Journal said, “It’s not clear if the programs work, as few studies have analyzed their effectiveness. There are no licensing requirements for anger-management trainers — anyone can open a business. And since participants don’t usually sign up voluntarily, trainers say it’s possible to complete a program without changing one’s behavior.” Also see NPR’s “The Anger Management Industry – Calming Courses on the Rise, But Do They Work?”

Now really, is there such a thing as curing a propensity to be an angry jerk? Or can counseling graft a nice personality on an overbearing putz? Or can it fix what one blogger hilariously calls HUAD – Head Up Ass Disorder?

Take, for example, that serial biting soccer footballer Luis Suarez who after two previous biting incidents during a game was recommended anger management treatment. Suarez’s now up to three bites with the latest administered on an Italian Player at the current World Cup. He’s been fined and banned for 4 months. Still the psychologists keep recommending anger management instead of bicuspid restraints.

http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/5f/e6/84/5fe684ecb7261693a426fe41022db7c1.jpg

Fortunately, even if anger management doesn’t work, there’s always Dr. Seuss. How about carrying around “Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?” in your pocket?

Truthfully, when it comes down to it, some people just don’t have the requisite people skills, civility and infinite patience to handle life stresses.

I’m all for reinvention — but as Clint said, “A Man’s Got to Know his Limitations.” If you can’t handle on-the-job anger, find another line of work.

Which to conclude, of course, reminds me of another ‘Old Skool’ golden oldie ditty.

It’s from my East Los Angeles Barrio days: “Are you angry?” So when all else fails — there’s always a song.

 


Photo Credits: James Brown Live Hamburg 1973 by Heinrich Klaffs Heinrich Klaffs – at Wikipedia Commons, originally posted to Flickr as James Brown Live 1702730029; Pin by Debbi Kassin on Anger Management & Conflict Resolution Dr. Seuss, Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?

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academic,dunce caps,dunces,hats,stoolsI’d meant to post about Arizona escaping the list of this year’s “Top 10 Dumbest States in America,” especially since my former home state of Nevada is an ignominious recidivist on the list.

 1) West Virginia

 2) Arkansas

 3) Mississippi

 4) Kentucky

5) Louisiana

6) Nevada

7) Alabama

8) Indiana

9) Oklahoma

10) Tennessee

And while I don’t put much stock in the ranking methodology, all the same I’m flummoxed at how Arizona dropped out. Just three years ago, Arizona sat at the pole position of America’s “Dumbest States.”

File:A-voluptuary.jpgThen again, dumb state or not some of you will think me cerebrally well-placed to live here since I was out golfing this past Saturday and Sunday when it was 100-plus outside. For some of you, this qualifies as dumb if not insane. And no matter those were days 7 and 8 on our consecutive day hit parade of triple-digit temperatures here with no relief in sight.

But this is par for June. Usually the hottest month in Satan’s nether region, it’s also just the start of our summertime ‘comfort zone’ in Arizona. You either go out into the inferno or you stay home, sort your sock drawer, and gaze at your navel.

And while I’m still planning on giving the local state bar another well-earned $3 hair cut, that post can keep. Instead, for all my friendly procrastinators waiting once again with under three weeks to spare before their annual June 30th fiscal year CLE deadline, here again is my now traditional fiscal year FREE CLE public service.

With the usual disclaimers about content quality, continued availability and jurisdictional credit-worthiness, find the following FREE CLE:

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 ASU LAW CLE – PAY WHAT YOU WANT CLE

On demand Pay What You Want CLE | ASU Law Continuing Legal Education

http://cle.asucollegeoflaw.com/voters-choice-cle-survey/#sthash.hrGrQ6KL.dpbs

I have little doubt the Continuing Legal Education Program at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law is hoping very few, if anyone, takes them up on the “$0″ option, which is part of their current offer of CLE based on a “pay what you want option.” You choose from their list of OnDemand recorded seminars and register for the program. You then “enter the amount you would like to pay. The amount you pay is unlimited and you can enter as little as $0. Once registered, you’ll receive the video access information and can follow the instructions to receive interactive CLE credit!”

Of course, these are the same folks who lawyer-glut and back-breaking student school debts or not — have nonetheless shamelessly decided to move into a $120 million law school Taj Mahal in downtown Phoenix. According to the Arizona Republic, “in documents being presented to regents, ASU said the goal is to increase law-school enrollment and degrees by 50 percent.

Meantime, the straight-faced ASU law school dean says of the Pay What You Want CLE: “Of course, we hope that most will still contribute something for the CLE credits they will earn. All proceeds will go to scholarships that will help us recruit high quality students, attract students that might otherwise not be able to afford law school, and have our new graduates enter the workforce with less debt burden.” 

Of course, we hope that most will still contribute something for the CLE credits they will earn.  All proceeds will go to scholarships that will help us recruit high quality students, attract students that might otherwise not be able to afford law school, and have our new graduates enter the workforce with less debt burden.” – See more at: http://cle.asucollegeoflaw.com/ondemand-pay-what-you-want-cle/#sthash.HZdrdunJ.dpuf

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ROCKET MATTER

Click here to go to online seminars

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“The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.” – Chief Justice John Roberts

For the moment forget my snark two years ago when I riffed on the US Supreme Court and Obamacare. In that post, I parenthetically mentioned how I often confuse two prominent legal ‘talking heads,’ Jeffrey Toobin and Jonathan Turley — a couple of guys I keep inexplicably mixing up about as much as I do Javier Bardem and Jeffrey Dean Morgan.

But unlike my categorical preference for Bardem over Morgan, on any given day I might prefer one legal beagle over the other. Today, having managed to keep them apart in my head, there’s good reason for me to like Toobin. It’s because of his timely post at the New Yorker, “Chief Justice Roberts, Meet Bundy and Sterling.”

“It is a sentiment out of touch with reality . . . .” – Associate Justice Sotomayor

It was a post I wish I’d written because it resonated so completely with my views on the state of race in America today. As recently as last January, for example, I’d related my thoughts on how race still matters. That was prompted by the outing of racist ex-judge Richard Cebull andOne more add on a marinated post-racial America.”

Toobin was first to the door, though, masterfully dovetailing ever so neatly Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and their respective racist viewpoints with the stirring stand-up-and-cheer 58-page dissent by Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor last week in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. That case involved a 2006 Michigan ballot initiative imposing a state constitutional ban on “all sex and race-based preferences in public education, public employment, and public contracting.” By a plurality, the nation’s high court ruled 6-2 that voters could ban such considerations of race and sex through the ballot box. See Schuette v. BAMN – Supreme Court of the United States.

Justice Sotomayor wrote, in part, “While our Constitution does not guarantee minority groups victory in the political process, it does guarantee them meaningful and equal access to that process. It guarantees that the majority may not win by stacking the political process against minority groups permanently, forcing the minority alone to surmount unique obstacles in pursuit of its goals—here, educational diversity that cannot reasonably be accomplished through race-neutral measures.”

And quoting from the dissent and referencing Chief Justice Roberts’ simplistic recipe for ending racial discrimination, Toobin opined: “Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote about a country where the Bundys and Sterlings still hold considerable sway. Indeed, she went beyond the simple bigotry of the Bundys and Sterlings and found that more subtle wounds of racism still exist in this country. “Race matters,” she wrote, “because of the slights, the snickers, the silent judgments that reinforce that most crippling of thoughts: ‘I do not belong here.’” Indeed, Sotomayor threw Roberts’s famous line back at him. She quoted him—“The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race”—and then wrote, “It is a sentiment out of touch with reality, one not required by our Constitution, and one that has properly been rejected as not sufficient to resolve cases of this nature. While the enduring hope is that race should not matter, the reality is that too often it does. Racial discrimination … is not ancient history.”

I’d planned to blog about the decision and particularly Justice Sotomayor’s dissent. But no matter. As John Lennon presciently warned, Life is what happens to you while you are busy making other plans.” So as it turns out, Toobin has instead captured it all so concisely and incisively that woulda-coulda-shoulda doesn’t matter. I refer you instead to his excellent post.

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Photo Credits: Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor by DonkeyHotey at Flickr via Creative Commons-license requiring attribution;

 

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lipstick pigProbably thinking I needed it, someone recommended a book with pithy business and life advice. When I looked it up, I discovered it was larded with the kind of time-worn advice that if you live long enough, you’ll see over and over again. Only the color of the lipstick changes, but it’s still the same pig.

Besides, how many times can you write about building a better mousetrap? It would appear, interminably. Cicero had his moral lessons and Marcus Aurelius his meditations on life and Ben Franklin his “Poor Richard’s Almanack.” And almost 30 years ago, Robert Fulghum had “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten” with his version of epigrammatic life lessons, including for example,

“1. Share everything.
2. Play fair.
3. Don’t hit people.
4. Put things back where you found them.
5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.
6. Don’t take things that aren’t yours.
7. Say you’re SORRY when you HURT somebody.
8. Wash your hands before you eat.
9. Flush.
10. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
11. Live a balanced life – learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work everyday some.
12. Take a nap every afternoon.
13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
14. Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Styrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.
15. Goldfish and hamster and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup – they all die. So do we.
16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first words you learned – the biggest word of all – LOOK.”

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/Pannage_in_the_New_Forest.JPG/320px-Pannage_in_the_New_Forest.JPGObviously, there’s a lot of wisdom in such writings. So there’s a reason the old chestnuts are repeatedly repackaged for consumption for each generation.

Over time a few of the aphorisms and “lessons” have even made their way here.

So a few days ago, courtesy of Dumb Little Man – Tips for Life, I came across Dan Bacon’s “10 Ways to Be a Better Man (No you aren’t already doing them all.”

Which of course made me immediately think of a favorite romantic comedy, “As Good as It Gets and what Melvin Udall (Jack Nicholson) memorably told Carol Connelly (Helen Hunt) on their dinner date — “You Make Me Want to Be a Better Man.”

And has it really been 17 years since that movie came out and she called it “the best compliment of my life”?

But no matter. Time to take stock of Bacon’s iteration and of course, to challenge his gender conceit of a “better man.” Clearly, the 10 ways can also apply to women. Consider it was feminist Gloria Steinem who said, “Far too many people are looking for the right person, instead of trying to be the right person.”

“1. Don’t Crumble Under Pressure.

2. Give, But Also Expect Respect in Return.

3. Love Others Without Judgement.

4. Have Life Purpose and Follow Through On It.

5. Be a Man of Your Word.

6. Always be Yourself.

7. Maintain Control of Your Emotions.

8. Be Someone That People Look Up To.

9. Take the Lead in Situations.

10. Take Full Responsibility For Your Own Success or Failure.”

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Photo Credits: “Pig and piglets in woodland alongside Ober Water, New Forest” by Jim Champion at Wikipedia Commons, the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

 

 

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