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Posts Tagged ‘compulsory bar’

https://cdn.morguefile.com/imageData/public/files/b/BonnieHenderson/01/l/1451713664si0nf.jpgThis week signals the official start of summer, which also means — it’s state bar convention time! The annual silly season has begun.

In addition to being the last continuing legal education money grab for state bars before the fiscal year ends, it’s also the annual “orgy of self-adulation”like the Oscars for bar insiders and connected elites.

Lawyers you never heard of — chosen by who-knows-who — will get awards only recipients will care about.

And oh, yeah incoming bar leaders will fatuously speechify after being pompously sworn in.

The Texas, South Dakota and Wisconsin Bar Annual Conventions started this week. Next week Arizona holds its 2018 State Bar of Arizona Annual Convention.

Termed its “flagship event,” Arizona conventioneers can anticipate at least a partial antidote to the rest of the Butt-Numb-A-Thon with a Thursday Party and the State Bar’s “Lawyers Got Talent” Contest.” And the jokes almost write themselves — a lawyer amateur talent show.

Anyhow, if there’s a dance competition, I hope these guys show up. They’re among Arizona’s cheekiest, ineradicable personal injury advertisers. Ka-ching! — they even bought a full-page color ad in the convention brochure. And with dance steps like these, how can they miss?

The Naked Truth.

In truth, the silliness started months ago. In March, the Utah State Bar inadvertently emailed a photo of a topless woman to every lawyer in the state to herald its upcoming Spring Bar Convention.

ABA Journal recounted, “The message, sent to all active Utah lawyers, was intended to promote the bar’s spring convention, reported the Salt Lake Tribune, the Deseret News and Above the Law, which posted the email and the nude photo (not safe for work) here. The email also included photos of a clothed Lady Justice statue and a rock formation.”

Embarrassed bar officials tweeted “Apologies to all who received an inappropriate email from the Utah State Bar. We are aware of the situation and are investigating the matter.”

And underscoring how you can’t make this stuff up, the Utah Spring Bar Convention kickoff reception also featured, “the 16th Annual “Secret Lives of Lawyers” Silent Auction.” See “Utah State Bar sends every local lawyer an email of a topless woman.”

Parenthetically, the Utah Bar holds not just one yearly convention — but two. The Summer Convention is July 25-28 in St. George — undoubtedly with new safeguards to prevent another bare-chested recurrence.

‘How do I love me . . . let me count the ways.’

Generally speaking, bar conventions are not well attended. Well under 10% of the bar’s lawyers, for example, annually attend in Arizona and even fewer in Nevada. This is unlikely to improve, especially for Nevada, which continues to price itself out of reach of many members by holding conventions in expensive venues.

Last year’s convention was in Austin and the year before it was Hawaii. This year’s paean to self-congratulation is next month at Chicago’s iconic Drake Hotel. Registration for the Nevada Bar Convention comes in at a hefty $590 per registrant — likely the most expensive registration of any bar annual meeting this year.

Those paying the hefty fee on top of airfare and hotel expenses can at least look to their inclusion at the President’s Dinner. According to the convention brochure, “This semi-formal (black tie optional) event celebrates the recipients of the 2018 State Bar of Nevada’s Membership Awards and incoming bar President Rick Pocker, who will become the state bar’s 90th president. In addition to a plated meal, guests will be able to enjoy entertainment and dancing, as well as a red-carpet style photographed entrance.”

Not to be outdone, though, the Arizona Bar will similarly fete its incoming president and dole out member awards only the recipients care about. And why not? Patting yourself on the back is part and parcel of these annual meetings.

With a hat tip to my buddy, The Legal Watchdog, Wisconsin’s 2018 Annual Meeting & Conference starts June 21st and apparently still scrounging for attendees, bar cheeseheads mistakenly curtailed the registration deadline before extending it to the penultimate day.

And in a rather ironic programming twist, one of the plenary speakers is P.J. O’Rourke, “author, humorist, and political satirist.” I hope he includes some of his most quotable observations about hubris — “one of the great renewable resources” as well as his pointed observations on bureaucracy, greed, and power — in other words all the traits of a compulsory membership bar association.

I suspect, however, there may be limits to the silliness in Lake Geneva, WI. O’Rourke will probably leave out his lawyer jokes such as this chestnut: “During the mid-1980s dairy farmers decided there was too much cheap milk at the supermarket. So the government bought and slaughtered 1.6 million dairy cows. How come the government never does anything like this with lawyers?”

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Credits: silly, bonnie henderson at morguefile.com; Thank You Gif via Tenor; Blog OMG! by Mike Licht at Flickr Creative Commons attribution; Shocking!!! “that guy isn’t wearing pants,” by Chuck Olson, Flickr Creative Commons attribution license.

 

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Samoan man in Hawaii | by foot fingers

Voluntary is ‘mo bettah.’

 

 Voluntary bar jurisdictions:

  1. Have a longer history than mandatory bar jurisdictions. The so-called integration movement didn’t start until 1913. That’s when the now defunct American Judicature Society‘s Herbert Harley motivated by the goals of overcoming low voluntary membership rolls; increasing revenues; reducing fragmentation; and enhancing professionalism; adopted bar unification as part of the Society’s law reform movement. According to research by Professor Theodore Schneyer, “voluntary state bar memberships in the 1920s included only 10% to 30% of the bar.” Parenthetically, predating the creation of the American Bar Association by 4 years and besting the New York State Bar Association by 2 years, the Iowa State Bar Association was formed in 1874 and claims to be “the oldest voluntary state bar association in the United States.” 18 jurisdictions in the U.S. are still voluntary. And to this day, voluntary bar membership in Iowa approaches 90%;
  2. Scandalized | by CarbonNYC [in SF!]Tend to have lower overall costs to practice; See Fact Check;

  3. Accomplish the public-protection goals of regulating discipline, managing bar admission, ensuring ethical standards, and registering lawyers, without integrating an existing bar association because these objectives are subject to statute or court rule and are not the responsibility of an integrated bar. For example, virtually every state in the country has in place court rules or statutes prescribing caretaker regulations when a lawyer disappears, dies, or is declared incompetent. And the same holds true for client protection funds, which likewise exist in both voluntary and mandatory bar jurisdictions. (The State Bar of Arizona makes much of its own lawyer caretaker conservatorship program although it budgets a mere 0.206% of a $14.5M budget to further buttress the purported necessity of a mandatory bar by virtue of having the program. But as of June 1, 2015 like almost every state in the country, Arizona has no rule requiring an attorney to designate a successor/surrogate/receiver in case of death or disability. A Rules Petition, however, was submitted in January but the matter was continued);

  4. Avoid the conflicts of interest between lawyers and the public. Voluntary state bar associations are autonomous private professional associations that unlike compulsory bar associations serve the interests of their voluntary members. They do not function like public agencies or regulatory bodies that subordinate member interests in favor of what mandatory bar leaders define as ‘the public good.’ And also unlike mandatory bar associations, the financial self-interest of voluntary associations is tied to a value proposition. Lawyers will refuse to maintain consensual membership in an association where the financial cost exceeds the value received;

  5. Without the Keller restrictions imposed on mandatory membership bar associations, voluntary state bar associations amplify the legal profession’s legislative voice in the lawmaking advocacy process. See, for example, Minnesota State Bar Government Relations and the Illinois State Bar Legislative Affairs Department;

  6. Jen, kissing the First Amendment goodbye? | by jasoneppinkProtect lawyer First Amendment rights without infringing on free speech and an individual’s freedom not to associate, which in the case of mandatory bar jurisdictions, results in the individual being compelled as a condition of earning a living in their profession, to contribute to an association which uses those fees to conduct activities to which that individual objects;

  7. Avoid recurring litigation over the use of compulsory dues for ideological activities; Most recently, see Fleck v. McDonald;

  8. Offer programs and services that favorably compare and even exceed those offered by mandatory state bar associations, including law office management practice services; insurance programs; reduced-cost and free CLE; Find-a-Lawyer member directories; Access to Justice initiatives; job hunting resources; Sections and Committees; lawyer referral services; Publications; Young Lawyer Divisions; Legal Research like Fastcase and Casemaker; Mentoring programs; leadership development programs; Annual Meetings; high school mock trial programs; community pro bono; ethics opinions and practice resources and even online practice tools. (Instead of making a good faith effort to ascertain the scope, content and quality of programs, services, and activities conducted by voluntary bars, mandatory bar proponents prefer to hide behind patent nonsense to justify compelled association);

  9. Are no different from mandatory bar associations in offering lawyer assistance resources to assist lawyers with problems with alcoholism, drug abuse and mental or emotional disorders. See, for instance, the New York State Bar Association’s Lawyer and Judges Assistance Program;

  10. Do not increase costs to the public since lawyers pay 100% of the costs of lawyer regulation in every U.S. state and territory. It is completely fallacious for mandatory bar proponents to spuriously claim that a mandatory bar has to be preserved because their programs and services could not be duplicated by a voluntary bar or that the elimination of a mandatory bar would place burdens on taxpayers. 

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Photo Credits: Samoan man in Hawaii, by Steve Bozak at Flickr Creative Commons Attribution; Jen, kissing the first amendment goodbye, by Jason Eppink at Flickr Creative Commons Attribution; Scandalized by David Goehring Flickr Creative Commons Attribution.

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