Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘mission and governance task force’

Pants on Fire | by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com“States that have voluntary bar associations by and large do not have lower overall bar dues,” says a footnote in the Draft Report posted by the Arizona Supreme Court’s State Bar of Arizona Mission and Governance Task Force. “They charge both a mandatory regulatory assessment and separate voluntary bar dues, which together often exceed the annual membership fee in the State Bar of Arizona.”

Sounds well and good — but too bad for the Kool-Aid guzzlers, it doesn’t pass a fact check.

Caricatures 14You can read the Draft Report here and find the above-mentioned quote at the bottom of page 13.

Fact-checking the Bar.

After the better part of a year, you’d think the Task Force would have spent a little more time fact-checking and getting its story straight. Or maybe like George Costanza, it just believes it — so it must be true.

Certainly, there’s a lot in the Task Force Report upon which to take exception, not the least being the conflated mythology again fluttered out on frayed wings that only a mandatory bar can “ensure professionalism and competence” and that only a mandatory bar can protect the public from its lawyers.

Night Shift 31This, of course, ignores the robust lawyer regulation and disciplinary regimes in 18 voluntary state bar jurisdictions. It also wrongs and misconstrues the panoply of membership benefits provided by voluntary bar associations, to name a few, like Ohio’s, Iowa’s, Colorado’s, New York’s, and Illinois.’

Indeed, many if not all the voluntary bar association programs and benefits rival and even exceed the programs, activities and services offered by the compulsory State Bar of Arizona.

And yet, the Arizona Bar likes to pretend that only mandatory bars make available client protection funds; offer law office management and lawyer assistance programs; provide continuing legal education courses; present annual bar conventions; publish monthly bar magazines or support ethics hotlines. Begging the question, the Draft Report shamelessly proclaims,These invaluable services will cease to exist with the demise of the integrated bar because no voluntary bar in Arizona offers them.”

Instead, see what happens in jurisdictions with voluntary bar associations, for example, check out: Ohio and Iowa and New York and Colorado and Illinois. Lawyers in those jurisdictions choosing to join their state’s voluntary bar associations don’t take a back seat to anything offered by the mandatory State Bar of Arizona.

Twain's Men's Room | by bump

 

morguefile.com photo

It takes two hands to put out this whopper.

As for the whopper about how both a mandatory regulatory assessment and separate voluntary bar dues, which together often exceed the annual membership fee in the State Bar of Arizona,” the facts are set out in the chart below.

The data concerning optional voluntary state bar association membership dues was obtained from readily available public online information from voluntary state bar jurisdictions. The attorney registration fee information comes from state court websites although since the Arkansas Supreme Court fee registration information was not publicly accessible, it was confirmed by a licensed Arkansas lawyer.

 

 

fees-sba-web

click to enlarge

The fees in the chart are the full fee maximums for lawyers practicing past the entry-level graduated fee periods. Newbie lawyer fees are typically discounted.

No MCLE in Connecticut, Maryland and Massachusetts.

And then take note of something else not mentioned in the chart. While the breathtaking $945.00 combined regulatory assessment and separate voluntary bar dues appear to make Connecticut a high cost to practice jurisdiction, the overall cost to practice is still lower than in Arizona. Why? Because unlike Arizona, Connecticut does not have mandatory continuing legal education (MCLE). This saves Connecticut lawyers anywhere from $600 to $1000 per year versus what Arizona lawyers pay to satisfy the annual 15 hour MCLE requirement.

The same is true of Massachusetts with its sizeable $761.00 combined regulatory assessment and separate voluntary bar dues. Massachusetts does not have a MCLE requirement. Nor does Maryland, which at $280.00 for both regulatory assessment and voluntary bar dues must be the lowest cost to practice jurisdiction in the United States.

Comparing overall costs to practice.

Work World 14The bottom line is two-fold: One, in voluntary bar states, lawyers can elect to pay only their court-mandated regulatory registration fees and forego joining a voluntary state bar association. This automatically reduces their overall cost to practice as compared to Arizona.

Two, the exact opposite is true of the Task Force’s claim that Arizona’s bar dues are often exceeded by the combined regulatory assessments and voluntary bar dues in voluntary bar jurisdictions. Lawyers in states that have voluntary bar associations pay lower overall bar dues, in some instances much less than the current and still escalating annual membership fee in the State Bar of Arizona, which hits $520 per year on January 1, 2018.

___________________________________________________________

Photo Credits: “Pants of Fire,” by Mike Licht at Flickr Creative Commons Attribution ; Twain’s Men’s Room, by Robert Occhialini at Flickr Creative Commons, Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License.

Read Full Post »

The State Bar of Arizona sent out a blast email to members last Thursday afternoon, April 2nd. The email sincerely insincerely asked for comments about its 2015-2019 Strategic Plan “to make sure we haven’t missed anything.” But the deadline for response was a mere 4 work days later by tomorrow, Tuesday, April 7th.

Most lawyers will miss the email, let alone respond. But then that’s hardly a surprise. The Bar makes a habit of eleventh-hour requests for member feedback. This way at least, it can always check the box that it asked for member input — even if it was late or after-the-fact.

It’s a tiresome stratagem since, as many of us know, a mandatory membership bar only pretends to care what members think or want.

 

For the autocratic Arizona Bar, top-down, under-the-radar decision-making is how it rolls.

So when the Bar asks for comments about its plans — it’s for appearances’ sake since the Bar believes more in dressing the window than in opening it to let in light and fresh air.

Strategic Plan Rehash.

In its request, the Bar linked to its one-page “Outline of Goals,” which briefly summarized its strategic planning committee’s five goals: competency; ethics; professionalism; administration of and access to justice; and professionalism.

It’s all much ado, however. The 2015-2019 plan is little more than a rehash of its over-the-top 2010-2015 five-year plan. See “AZ Bar drafts up 5 year vision but misses the mark” and “Arizona Bar releases five-year vision”

And per usual, the outline is full of self-congratulation but also per usual, light on metrics. Where are the sets of measurements to quantify results? Where are the performance metrics to quantify performance? Or the project metrics to verify attainment of goals?

And what about the Bar’s continued problems with transparency, due process and communication? Or the failure to address the prioritization of resources and the elimination of low priority programs and services? Of course not. It’s all lip in search of service. For comparison, see the Nebraska State Bar’s revised strategic plan after its supreme court made most of its programs and services optional.

The Bar’s plans are merely a means not to “sustain efficient and effective management of Bar resources” as the outline states — but excuses for mission creep, the bureaucratic Bar’s ingrained love for gradually broadening its original organizational objectives.

In the end, however, the short turnaround time for member response is of little import since the Bar’s poised to simply repeat what it did in 2010 and again prospectively proclaim its purported objectives a done deal: “The State Bar of Arizona demonstrates excellence in every area: operations, programs, resource management, policy and planning, and citizenship.”

“To Protect and to Serve.”

My only other thought is to wonder why the Bar even bothered to do a strategic plan since the state supreme court has undertaken its own state bar through a task force it created in August. Any strategic plan will be subordinated and subsumed by what the task force recommends to the court.

Indeed, according to the task force’s mostly completed work, the state supreme court will soon be retooling its rules “to clarify that the mission of the State Bar of Arizona is primarily to protect and to serve the public, and secondarily, to serve its members.”

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/24/Jackwebbbbigseptemberman.jpg

“All we know are the facts, ma’am.”

Or in other words, as a bar executive once told me, to function “like a consumer protection agency”  — i.e., to protect the public from its members.

So much for all the soft-pedaled mush language in the strategic plan outline about ‘promoting and enforcing the highest member ethical conduct’ or about ‘enhancing the Bar’s protection of the public.’

_______________________________________________________________________

Photo Credits: “Don’t Listen,” by Sean Loyless at Flickr via Creative Commons Attribution; “Chris,” by Paris Buttfield-Addison at Flickr via Creative Commons Attribution;104/365 “These are the times we all wish for,” by bp6316 at Flickr via Creative Commons Attribution; “LAPD Seal,” by JBrazito at Flickr via Creative Commons Attribution; Jack Webb, via Wikipedia Commons.

Read Full Post »

https://brandtao.files.wordpress.com/2007/08/groupthink.gif?w=411&h=231

In August, I reported the Arizona Supreme Court had directed the creation of a state bar task force to review “The Role and Governance Structure of the State Bar of Arizona.” But knowing how things roll around here, I had of meaningful reforms. In the words of Laurence J. Peter, “Bureaucracy defends the status quo long past the time when the quo has lost its status.”

Groupthinking task force.

https://i0.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/66/Groupthink_Model.jpg/320px-Groupthink_Model.jpg

Arizona Bar leadership is notorious for group-think; tone-deafness; and smug self-congratulation. Far as Bar leadership’s concerned, ‘Everything Is AWESOME!!!

Business as usual.

Entertainment 606The task force has met five times and even started prepping its “initial, and very rough, draft report.”  But ‘fugetaboutit,’ there’s nothing to clap about.

Zero-based inquiry? Dissenting opinions? After reading five meeting minutes, save for cosmetic changes consisting of renaming the Bar’s board; seating fewer board members; and imposing overdue term limits — it’s clear without dissenters on the task force, it was preordained business as usual.

When thirty-six percent of the task force is composed of past members of the Bar’s board of governors, four of them also past presidents, including the immediate past president — expect no surprises.

Then there’s this, the appointed task force “consultant” ‘splainin‘ things to underinformed task force public members is the Bar’s well-paid CEO. Or as former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi once said, “If I, taking care of everyone’s interests, also take care of my own, you can’t talk about a conflict of interest.” A mission and governance review with such guiding lights is like hunting with the game warden.

BoredThe recommendations so far:

“#1: The Task Force recommends amendments to Supreme Court Rule 32(a) to clarify that the mission of the State Bar of Arizona is primarily to protect and to serve the public, and secondarily, to serve its members.

“#2: The Task Force recommends “restyling” Rule 32(a) for clarity and for easier comprehension.

“#3: The name of the board of governors should be changed to the board of trustees. This change acknowledges the fiduciary responsibility of board members . . . .

“#4: The size of the board should be reduced to 15 to 18 voting members. The Task Force recommends a board of 15 members.

“#5: Some members of the board should be selected through an electoral process, and other members should be appointed.

“#6: A significant portion of the board should be public members who have no financial interest in the practice of law . . . .

“#7: To assure that appointed members have the skills and experience necessary for service on the board, a process should be created for recruitment, vetting, and nomination of appointees . . . .

“#8: Board members should serve staggered terms to preserve continuity of leadership and institutional knowledge.

Politicians 34“#9: Board members should have term limits. The number of terms depends on the length of terms, but generally, board members should serve no more than 8-12 years.

“#10: Attorney members of the board, whether elected or appointed, should have no less than 5 years’ experience as lawyers, and a clean disciplinary record for the 5 years preceding service on the board.

“#11: Court rules should include a process for removing board members for good cause. The Task Force did not define “good cause,” but it might include commission of serious crimes, commencement of or sanction for formal discipline, etc. The Task Force proposes removal of a board member on a two-thirds vote of the board, conditioned on the Court’s ratification.

LAW AND JUSTICE 12“#12: Ex officio members bring value to the board. The immediate past president of the bar, and an associate Supreme Court justice, should serve on the board as ex officio, non-voting members. The Court should appoint one law school dean as an ex officio member, with the appointment rotating annually or bi-annually among the deans of Arizona’s law schools.

“#13: The leadership track of the board of trustees should consist of three officers: a president, a president-elect, and a secretary-treasurer, who should serve one-year terms of office.”

Having the cake and eating it, too.

The task force glanced at the 148-page report submitted by the Task Force on the Role of the State Bar of Michigan — but like the guy that licks the frosting but leaves the cake, the task force only liked Michigan’s affirmation of mandatory membership. The rest was irrelevant.

This file is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 2.0 Germany License.

Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 2.0 Germany License.

To the surprise of possibly only a squirrel with a backpack, Arizona’s task force recommended “that Arizona continue to have a mandatory (integrated) bar.”  See Mission & Governance Draft Minutes

As for the Arizona Bar’s posture concerning the reason the Michigan State Bar Task Force was created, i.e., whether as a mandatory bar, the Michigan Bar could fulfill “its core mission of service to the public and our members within the constitutional boundaries defined by Keller v. State Bar of California” — well, that was given short shrift.

Not like it mattered that the genesis of the Michigan Task Force was a state bar letter to the Michigan Supreme Court opposing a Michigan Bill to make bar membership voluntary. Noting that the bill raised “questions about the operation of the State Bar as a mandatory organization that are most appropriately addressed within the judicial branch pursuant to the Supreme Court’s exclusive constitutional authority . . . For that reason, we write to request that the Supreme Court initiate a review of how the State Bar operates within the framework of Keller v. State Bar of California, 496 US 1 (1990).”

But since the State Bar of Arizona back-pats itself “Keller-pure” — the task force opted not to go there. ‘We’re good.’ Ditto on the Bar’s programs, services and activities — its amazingness is everywhere!

To review all meeting minutes and related documents go to AZCourts.gov

______________________________________________________________________

Photo Credits: cartoon source “group think or team win” by brandtao;chart based on Irving Janis groupthink model by HaleyB3, Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons attribution;11326426096.jpg and 113264261341.jpg by sideshowmom at Morguefile.com; Nom cake! by Sirenz Lorraine at Flickr via Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs License.

Read Full Post »