Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘unconstitutional lawyer speech code’

In June I wondered whether the Nevada Bar would be first to impose an unconstitutional speech code on their members. In May, that Bar’s governing board had filed a petition asking the state supreme court to amend a lawyer professional conduct rule, specifically ABA Model Rule 8.4(g).

Purporting to prohibit lawyers from engaging in harassing or discriminatory conduct, the new, vague, and over broad ABA Model Rule 8.4(g) would have chilled free speech; weaponized lawyer discipline; and infringed on lawyers’ free exercise rights.

Surprise, surprise, surprise!

As it happens, though, another state beat Nevada to the punch. In August, Vermont surprised a lot of people — not the least being Vermont lawyers — to become the first and so far, the only jurisdiction to adopt the ABA’s suggested model rule.

Noting how there were “zero public comments submitted,” law professor Josh Blackman wrote on his blog, “The bar counsel for the state’s professional responsibility program boasted, “So as you can see, this rule obviously had a lot of support.” 

Opposition in Nevada

As for Nevada, acknowledging that “many comments were filed in opposition . . . that caused the Board to pause,” the Nevada Bar backed off its rule change petition in a letter to the state high court declaring “it prudent to retract.” Just the same, in what seems little more than face-saving, the Board also expressed its “reservation to refile” if and when supposed inconsistent language in other jurisdictions is sorted out. That all this so-called inconsistency in other jurisdictions was already well-known is, of course, unmentioned. Every jurisdiction, after all, is free to adopt its own professional conduct rules.

It’s also worthy of note that though the court twice extended the public comment period, no comments were ever filed in favor of the Bar’s petition. All comments filed were opposed. The Board’s request was granted September 25, 2017.

So Vermont notwithstanding, the proposal has to date continued facing strong opposition not just in Nevada but elsewhere. The key is lawyers being adequately informed about it. What has to be overcome are the preferences of mandatory bar majordomos inclined toward the enactment of onerous initiatives as fait accompli with little preceding notice, detection or commotion. But when lawyers are told and widely noticed the opportunity to comment, legal elites have problems flying their officious meddling under-the-radar.

So far the proposed ABA Model Rule 8.4(g) has been turned back in other states, including Illinois, South Carolina and Louisiana. It has been roundly criticized in Texas and failed to find traction in Montana. See “Montana legislature says ABA model rule on discrimination and harassment violates First Amendment.”

The rule is currently under review in Utah but has encountered powerful headwinds there, too. It is opposed in Idaho. And in Arizona, opponents are galvanized to fight an ABA Model Rule 8.4(g) petition queued up for January 2018.

Yet despite all this, this month the ABA Journal took artistic license to soft pedal the reality of this mounting widespread antagonism to the lawyer speech code, writing, “States split on new ABA Model Rule limiting harassing or discriminatory conduct.”

Vermont, apparently, wasn’t an outlier. “States split,” they say.

And I’m a superhero.

Alternative facts, alas, remain in vogue.

 

____________________________________________________________________

Credits: “Oral Exam,” by Ben Sutherland at Flickr Creative Commons Attribution; “What,” by Alexander John, Flickr Creative Commons Attribution; “40+112 Superhero Fail,” by Bark at Flickr Creative Commons Attribution.

.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »